SHARON FITZKE | Palm City Real Estate, Stuart Real Estate, Jensen Beach Real Estate


If you’re trying to decide whether or not you should put a pool in at your home, there’s a lot to think about. You don’t want to regret spending a sizable amount of money. You may picture a life of luxury with a pool, but there’s a lot involved with the installation of it. It can be quite an ongoing investment to put in a pool. Maintenance, repairs, and more are involved. Depending upon the climate you live in, you may need to put a cover on the pool during the offseason as well.


When Putting In A Pool Is A No-Brainer


If you live in a warm climate like California, Florida, Hawaii, Or Arizona, it makes total sense to invest in a pool. these places get the maximum benefit from pool installation since the pool can be used the whole year through. 


If you have a large yard and are able to accommodate both a pool and some yard space, it’s also not a bad idea to put in a pool. The important thing is that you understand that you’re not always going to get a return on your investment when you sell your home. Not all homebuyers like pools and often the presence of a pool can even deter some buyers from even looking at the home.


Questions To Ask Regarding Return On Investment:


  • Does a pool fit in with the neighborhood?
  • Is the pool in good condition?
  • How old is the pool?

The idea with homes that have pools is to attract the right buyers. Many times, families with young children stay away from properties with pools since they see it as a safety hazard. Other home shoppers may fall in love with the property because of the pool. The important thing about putting in a pool is knowing that you as a homeowner will enjoy the feature. 


Costs


The average cost to put in a pool in the US is around $30,000. That’s just a basic pool. You’ll probably need to add a few more details like fencing, pool furniture, and more landscaping. That can cause the total investment to rise significantly. The type of pool that you choose also has an effect on the cost of the project. Don’t forget about the added energy expenses of running a filter and putting a heater in the pool. 


Insurance


When you have a pool, you’ll need to change the type of insurance that you have. The pool can increase your insurance costs significantly. There also could be certain requirements set forth by the insurance company, such as the pool needing to be fenced in. 


While adding a pool to your home may make your life more enjoyable, it may not add to the value and return you get on your home. Don’t over invest in an amenity that won’t give you the returns your looking for unless you’re prepared and know that you as a homeowner will truly enjoy the pool.


Although you may be tempted to spontaneously make an offer on a house that triggers happy memories of your childhood, it's usually best to approach house buying in a methodical, dispassionate way.

Your emotions will come into play as you visit different listings, but they should be tempered by a realistic budget, a list of personal requirements, and a sprinkling of "wish list" items -- ones that will help make your new home extra special!

A lot will depend on whether you're a first-time home buyer or a seasoned home owner. In all likelihood, the more houses you've owned, the higher your expectations will be. That's certainly not a hard-and-fast rule, but it does lend itself to reason. As is the case with most things in life, experience tends to clarify our needs, our tolerances, our quality standards, and our lifestyle preferences.

Buying a home is a huge decision for two reasons: It not only impacts our financial situation (both immediate and long term), but it effects our quality of life for the foreseeable future. So, similar to the institution of marriage, buying a house is a commitment that should not be taken lightly!

Fortunately, there are several effective ways to help ensure that the home you buy will live up to your expectations. One of the most steadfast "anchors" you can have in your search for the ideal home is a seasoned real estate agent. They have the training, knowledge, and communication skills to help you find the house, the right property, and the optimal location that will best suit your needs.

Your agent will work closely with you to create a list of house hunting requirements and preferences. Although the location, school district, and number of bedrooms will probably have a major bearing on your decision, there are literally dozens of other features and characteristics that will influence your final choice. Among those will be square footage, number of bathrooms, and the property's tax rate.

Standard checklists that include a wide range of home buyer requirements are available online and through your real estate agent. These checklists will help you rank each house you visit and objectively compare the homes you like the best. While flexibility is a necessary part of a successful house-hunting campaign, there will invariably be items you won't want to compromise on.

By deciding in advance what your new home should include, you'll create a clear vision of the type of living environment you and your family will find the most satisfying. Whether you're looking for a home with an open floor plan, a screened-in porch, one or more fireplaces, a finished basement, a two-car garage, or ample space between neighbors, getting your requirements down on paper is the first step to turning your house-buying goals into reality!



This listing recently sold for $119,500.

4471 Se Roaring Brook Way, Stuart, FL 34997  

Residential
$124,500
Price
$119,500
Sale Price
3
Bedrooms
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Hard to find at this price! Concrete block 3 bedroom 1 1/2 bath 1/2 duplex with metal roof and on a corner lot! Recently updated full bath, neutral tone tile throughout living area and bedrooms (no carpet!)-Nice kitchen w/tumbled marble backsplash-Extra 1/2 bath in laundry room-Screened porch in back-Security system-Owner extended driveway for extra parking (permits pulled)-Perfect location, just minutes to I-95, downtown and all shopping! Being sold ''AS IS'' with right to inspect-


3020 S Kanner Highway, Stuart, FL 34994  

Residential
$435,000
Price
3
Bedrooms
2
Baths
Tucked away off the beaten track is this crisp & clean 3 bedroom 2 bath deep waterfront home (no fixed bridges)! This perfect size home features earth tone tile throughout, combination living & dining area, family room, efficient kitchen with newer appliances (except fridge), pass through window to a breakfast bar and spacious covered screened porch-Concrete dock and seawall w/water & electric takes you out to the S. Fork of the St. Lucie river and beyond! Very private location with only 2 other homes on the street, yet just minutes to downtown Stuart and I-95; Your own little hideaway! No HOA or Deed Restrictions!


Whether you’re shopping for your first house or your next house, finding a listing you love is exciting. You browse the pictures, check out the property facts, share the link to your significant other, and maybe even schedule a showing.

With the exciting prospect of owning a new home that has all or many of the features you’re looking for, it can be easy to forget about certain details that matter. Most of us look for similar things in a house--close proximity to work, enough bedrooms, an upgraded kitchen, and so on.

In this article, we’re going to give you a list of things to investigate about the house you’re looking at to get a better idea of whether or not it’s the perfect match for you and your family.

1. Re-read the listing

If you’re like me and get lost in the photos of a home and forget to make note of the details, be sure to go back and check out the listing a second time. It will likely give you important details of the house that you overlooked on your initial visit.

Look for things like the year the house was built, information of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system, and the total acreage of the lot and square footage of the home. These things are hard to accurately represent in the listing’s pictures, but will likely be important to your decision of whether or not you should view the home.

2. Do your online research

The number of things you can learn about a home and neighborhood on the internet is astounding. We suggest that before you go to visit a home, you spend 10-20 minutes on Google researching the following topics:

  • School district ratings. If you have or plan to have school-aged children, you’ll want to know what your options are for your child’s education. It’s often a good idea to check out the local schools’ websites to see what

  • Commute times. With Google Maps and similar sites, you can plan out what your new commute will be and see how long it will take. You might find different routes that will save you time or avoid traffic (we could all use those extra few minutes in bed every morning). Google Maps isn’t always accurate when it comes to morning traffic estimates, but it’s a good place to start.

  • Amenities. Having moved into a neighborhood that has no grocery stores within a 20-minute drive, trust me--you’ll want to know what’s in the area. Use Google Maps to find stores, gas, schools, parks and trails, hospitals, and other things you’ll want close by.

  • Street view. While we’re on Google, use street view to take a remote look around the neighborhood. You’ll be able to see how the infrastructure looks--if the neighborhood is taken care of and if there are sidewalks that offer a safe place to walk or jog.

  • Crime ratings. Don’t get too caught up in this section. Crimes happen everywhere, but this is a good way to see if the area you’re moving to is a safe place

3. Don’t be afraid to ask questions

If, after all of your online research, you decide you want to go view a home, don’t be shy when you arrive. It’s understandable that you wouldn’t want to be a burden in someone else’s home. But remember--if you’re considering living there someday you’ll want to know as much as possible before making an offer.

Test the plumbing, ask about average utilities, and don’t be afraid to introduce yourself to neighbors and ask them questions about the community. The more you know, the better. Happy sleuthing!